Visiting Slimbridge Wetland centre

Nothing suggests spring to me  more than seeing downy ducklings on a lake and one of our favourite places to go at this time of year is slimbridge Wetland centre near Gloucester.   Click here to find out more I love to wander along the well made trails or try to spot new arrivals from one of the hides.

Sir Peter Scott

Sir Peter Scott who established the Slimbridge Wetland centre was the son of the Antarctic explorer Robert Scott who lost his life while trying to be the first man to reach the south pole. Like many men of his generation and class Peter was  keen on shooting game in his youth. However after fighting in the second world war he had seen enough bloodshed and decided instead to conserve wildlife. In 1946 he bought a large estate on the banks of the  Severn estuary  in the village of Slimbridge and set aside the marshy land as a sanctuary for water birds.

A few random facts. Peter Scott was named after Peter Pan (J.M. Barrie was one of his godfathers). He won an Olympic medal for sailing and he designed the panda logo for the WWF.

He also became a keen and talented painter of wildlife and built himself a house overlooking a lake with a large picture window where he could watch ducks and geese on the lake.

Visiting Slimbridge wetland centre

Swans on the lake by the main building
Swans in front of the main building. This is the view from the restaurant.

The wetland centre at Slimbridge is now open to the public . The charity has pulled off the difficult trick of being able to carry out internationally recognised scientific and conservation work while still providing fun activities for children. There are over 100 acres of streams, ponds and lakes to explore and  photograph. Some birds like the colonies of flamingos are permanent residents others are winter or summer migrants.

For adults there are hides where you can undertake serious birdwatching and an art gallery where you can see a collection of wildlife paintings including some by Sir Peter Scott himself.  Local artists also often exhibit their work. Volunteer guides lead tours round the site and there are posters and information boards to help with bird identification.

The website always gives advice about which feathered visitors to look out for and what talks and activities are planned.

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Swan lake

Children’s activities.

Slimbridge is also a wonderful place to take your children or grandchildren.

A firm favourite  is welly boot land where young children can put on their wellington boots and paddle   in small streams and puddles and pretend to be ducks. For older children there are canoe safaris and places to go pond dipping . There is also an adventure playground with  a nearby coffee shop.  The staff encourage visitors to buy bags of duck food to feed the birds.  Be sure to check to see the times for activities such as otter feeding or duckery talks. If it is wet there is an indoor soft play area and art and craft activities.

As well as birds Slimbridge wetland centre is home to a family of otters and also a small collection of amphibians and reptiles.

The  practicalities

The website has details of admission prices. Tickets are discounted if bought online and admission is free for WWT members.  There is ample free parking but Slimbridge has no bus or rail service. It is well signposted from junction 13 or 14 of the M5.

Slimbridge has a very good restaurant with huge picture windows overlooking a lake where you can watch the birds as you eat and a large souvenir shop. They are also happy for you to bring a picnic.  You should allow four or five hours for a visit.

The future

Slimbridge  Wetland Trust received  a £4,000,000 grant from the national lottery and they are planning to open several exciting new attractions. The newest is a replica of the Arctic hut used by Sir Peter Scott to study geese in the tundra.

Have you been to Slimbridge? Please feel free to add your own tips in the comments. I would love to hear what you think.

This post will be added to link parties for blogging grandparents.

blogging grandmothers link party 36  If you are a grandmother who blogs please join us.

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Canada goose and goslings

The New Room Bristol and John Wesley

Did you know Charles and John Wesley built the very first Methodist chapel here in Bristol?

A lot of people visit Broadmead, the shopping district in the middle of Bristol without realising that the chapel exists.   But you can discover it  opposite the Galleries shopping centre by Marks and Spencers .

The chapel is painted white and decorated with simple candlesticks.
The simple plain Newroom chapel.

The chapel is now a grade 1 listed building.  It  is very simply furnished and was built with no  windows on the ground floor to protect it from mobs.    The upstairs where Charles and John  Wesley often stayed has been turned into an interesting museum with the help of a lottery grant.  According to trip advisor is the 6th favourite visitor attraction in Bristol. Some of the rooms are furnished in the style of the period and others contain displays about the life of the Wesleys and the early history of Methodism.  Activities for children including a wardrobe of 17th century dressing up clothes.  Children are even invited to take selfies  in the rooms.

I recommend the quiet tearoom if you want a peaceful place to chat or relax in the centre of Bristol. They sell home made cakes and light lunches. When I visited recently with our German group we enjoyed a slice of Earl Grey tea loaf with our excellent coffee.

John Wesley

John Wesley was the son of an Anglican clergyman.  He was born in 1703 near Lincoln. As a  five year old boy he was lucky to escape a house fire by being rescued from an upstairs window. He went to Oxford gained an M.A. and was ordained as an Anglican. After working as a curate  he travelled to Savannah in Georgia where he worked for a couple of years before returning to England. In America he experienced slavery at first hand and became a lifelong opponent of the system. Later he rescued two escaped slave boys and brought them to Bristol where he sent them to a school he had founded and helped finance some of the early antislavery literature.

On his return to England another clergyman George Whitefield invited him to come to Bristol. Bristol at that was growing rich on  the profits from the slave trade.  However there was a large divide between rich and poor. Wesley was working  in Broadmead the heart of the sprawling overcrowded old city while the rich people were moving west to suburbs like Clifton and Hotwells.

Wesley was  concerned about  the poverty he saw around him and worked to establish schools and dispensaries for medicines. He distributed food and clothing to the poor.  He also preached in the local prison. His views were unpopular with many of the established clergy who often refused him permission to use their churches. He was able to raise enough funds to build the New Room as a place for ordinary people to worship.

Preaching to the coalminers.

Kingswood to the east of Bristol near where I grew up was in the 18th century  a poor coal mining district.  None of the local vicars would let him preach in their churches so he preached out in the open attracting a large crowd. When I was a girl I could see a green beacon from my bedroom window which marked the spot of one of his early sermons.  Although I am not a Methodist he became one of my local heroes.

He was later joined by his younger brother Charles also an ordained minister and together they rode thousands of miles on horseback preaching in small villages. They preached in cottages, chapels and even fields.

John Wesley was described as “below medium height, well proportioned, strong with a bright eye , a clear complexion and a saintly intellectual face.

A statue of John Wesley on horseback.
This statue of John Wesley with his bible in hand is in the courtyard outside the Newroom.

The Wesley family were gifted musicians. Both brothers wrote hundreds of hymns.

John Wesley seated at a piano. Stained glass window.
John and Charles Wesley were very musical.

John Wesley was also a skilled organiser and administrator and was able to lay the foundations of Methodism. He died aged 87 in 1791.

Visiting the New Room

The chapel and café are free to visit but there is a small charge to see the museum. Entry to the museum includes a free audio guide.  It is open from Monday to Friday from 10.30 to 4.00 p.m. with last entry to the museum at 3.30 p.m. The museum has a lift and there are toilets including a disabled toilet and baby changing facilities on the first floor. The nearest carpark is in the Galleries shopping centre and it is a short walk from the main bus station. The newroom has a very informative website. Click here to visit. If you are unable to visit in person the website even has a 360 degree tour. A service is held in the chapel every Friday afternoon.

This stained glass window shows John Wesley preaching outdoors #newroom
John Wesley preaching in the open. New Stained Glass window.

Walking tour of Georgian Bath

I belong to a walk in the past, history walking group and last Sunday we explored Georgian  Bath.  Bath which is a UNESCO world heritage site still markets itself as a Georgian city.  In the 18th century  the aristocracy flocked here to take the waters, to gamble or to find a suitable spouse.   Jane Austen who lived in the city for a few years vividly described life in regency Bath  in books such as “Northanger Abbey” .

We met in North Parade terrace a fashionable street which overlooks Parade gardens. In the 18th century the idle rich paraded here in all their finery. Now it is a pleasant place to sit and watch the world go by. You can hire a deckchair and buy an ice cream.

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A summer’s day in Parade gardens which overlooks the river Avon. Photo provided by Visit Bath.

We were admiring the houses and one of the owners asked if we would like to look inside. He seemed quite happy to let all twenty five of us plus two dogs climb upstairs to admire the view.

The Architecture

Much of Bath was designed by two architects, a father and son, John Wood the elder and John Wood the younger. They were free masons and they used a lot of freemasonry symbols. It is said that the Royal crescent and the Circus, (a ring of houses) represent the sun and the moon. They were certainly keen to bring the countryside into the city and luckily the green spaces have been preserved. Bath has very strict planning laws and all buildings still have to be made from the honey coloured Bath stone quarried from the nearby hills. The Georgian developers destroyed most of the medieval city in their rush to build Palladian houses where the rich and important could lodge for the season. Number 1 Royal crescent has been furnished and decorated in 18th century style and is now a museum.

Aerial photo showing the layout of the Georgian city.
Aerial view of the circus and crescent supposed to represent the sun and the moon.

Our walk took in Queen’s square with its famous obelisk. This reflects the interest in Egypt in the period.

The Obelisk was put up in the 18th century.
The Obelisk in Queen’s square (my photo)

High society in Georgian Bath

Richard Nash who became known as Beau Nash was the self appointed Master of ceremonies for many years. he kept a list of the 500 most important visitors and controlled invitations to balls and soirees. He  also helped to control the gambling and became very rich on the proceeds before loosing his fortune at the tables.

We also looked in the Pump room where visitors used to take the water . You can now get an expensive afternoon tea there and imagine yourself in a recency novel.

The Assembly Rooms, one of Bath’s finest Georgian buildings, was purpose built in 1771 for a particular 18th century form of entertainment: the assembly; ‘a stated and general meeting of the polite persons of both sexes for the sake of conversation, gallantry, news and play’. Guests would gather in the rooms in the evening for balls, concerts and other social functions, or simply to play cards and socialise. (National trust). it now houses a fashion museum which is well worth a visit. We went inside to admire the magnificent glass chandeliers.

Bath pump room
The Pump room with the abbey in the background (my photo)

Bath’s fortunes declined in the 19th century. Queen Victoria was not as keen on idle pursuits and preferred to holiday on the Isle of Wight or in Scotland and later seaside resorts such as Brighton became more popular.

This post follows on from a previous Bath walk 

It has been added to a link party for blogging grandmothers.

If you want to find out more information about visiting Bath here is a link to the Bath tourist office.

The Mayor’s guides offer daily free walking tours of Bath.  They start at 10 A.M. and 2 P.M. from Abbey Square.

Some of the photos for this post were used with permission from visit Bath.

Visiting Bletchley Park

A local college offers free study weekends for the “young at heart” over fifties.  I am not sure we qualify as young at heart but I liked the sound of one of the activities on offer a functional Mathematics study day and a visit to Bletchley park home of the wartime code breakers.

I very much enjoyed the film “the imitation game” particularly Benedict Cumberbatch’s performance as Alan Turing and was keen to see the place where it was set. It is over fifty years since I studied mathematics at school so I thought a refresher course would be good and might even  get the grey cells working.

The Discover weekend

We arrived at the college on Saturday and I was surprised to see how many over fifties were prepared to give it a go.  In England the retirement age for women has gone up to 65 and for both men and women it will soon be 66.  Many participants were women in their fifties who were keen to add a qualification to their C.V. There were also a good smattering of people like us who have already retired. I think my husband at 78 was one of the oldest.

One of the morning activities was planning a party for 50 people and bringing it in on budget which was quite good fun and certainly tested our basic maths skills. We had to estimate the amount of flooring and length of fairy lights needed for a marquee. As well as plan the type and quantity of food we would need.

The college provided us with a tasty lunch of cottage pie and fruit crumble .  Then in the afternoon we took a short test. They will send it away to be marked and if we pass we will get our certificates in a few weeks. The day finished with tea or coffee and lemon drizzle cake.

Bletchley Park

The large red brick mansion at Bletchley Park.
The rather grand mansion at Bletchley Park now houses a restaurant where you can enjoy lunch or afternoon tea.

On Sunday we got up early and my husband drove us to the college where a coach was waiting to take us to Bletchley Park. The journey took about two and a half hours and on the way we watched “The imitation game”  so that we could understand some of the background to the work done at Bletchley Park.

Bletchley Park is a beautiful mansion  near Milton Keynes which was bought by M16 the top secret government department   responsible for spying.  We learnt that a network of code breakers had been built up during the Spanish Civil war and when the Second world war was declared they received a message “aunt Flo is ill”. This was instruction to go to Bletchley Park.

Eventually almost seven thousand people worked at Bletchley Park. They were a strange mixture of university educated mathematicians, linguists, typists and amateur radio hams. I was surprised to learn that more women were employed there than men.

A plaque on the wall at Blechley Park
A plaque inside the manor with a fitting Shakespearean quote.

The big prize was cracking the German Enigma code.  The German code was thought to be unbreakable and it changed very day. Alan Turing and his team were able to build a machine to crack this and from about 1942 we were able to read the German messages. They were helped in this by the earlier work of Polish mathematicians.  Staff at Bletchley Park  had to keep this secret and were not able to act on many of the messages they deciphered.  It is thought that their work saved many thousands of lives. A particular success was ensuring that U boats did not attack the D day landing ships.

Churchill, the Prime minister was a big supporter of Bletchley Park and made sure they had sufficient funds to carry out their work. He also made sure they had leisure facilities including a tennis court.

As well as cracking the enigma code teams worked on deciphering Morse code messages and deciphering codes in other languages including Japanese.

I found the exhibitions extremely interesting. The displays included a lot of  fascinating quotations from the ordinary people who had worked there.

As we walked around the grounds we heard sound effects such as a spitfire flying overhead or an old lorry backfiring which added realism.  We were able to enter some of the huts where the decoding took place and see a replica bombe machine which was built to crack the Enigma code. There was also a very interesting exhibition on the part played by homing pigeons as messengers.

Part of the bombe machine used to crack the enigma code.
Replica bombe machine (stock image)

The practicalities

The Bletchley Park site  has a restaurant and two cafes. To add authenticity our drinks were served in wartime tin mugs. There is a playpark but I think younger children would be bored.  It is open everyday except for a few days at Christmas.   You need to allow three or four hours to see everything and real enthusiasts might need longer. Every where is accessible for wheelchair users or pushchairs but some of the paths are gravel. In the summer you can picnic by the lake. Entrance costs from £18.00 and  tickets are valid for a year. You can book a free guided tour with a volunteer guide or pick up a free audio guide. There is also a well stocked souvenir shop.

A wartime office recreated inside Bletchley Park
This office inside the mansion has been lovingly recreated.

Discover courses

If you live in or near South Gloucestershire and are over fifty. You may want to see what other Discover courses are available. You can do one English and one Mathematics course  which are held at the Wise campus in Stoke Gifford. Other coach trips this year include The Tate Gallery, London  and Stratford on Avon (English) and Exeter, food and Wine fayre (Maths). I thoroughly recommend it for a weekend with a difference.

This post has been added to link parties for blogging grandmothers and I would be interested to learn if other colleges offer similar opportunities.

An old Chad Valley teddy bear wearing checked shorts.
Alan Turing’s teddy bear on display